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are running rampant. not only are they running rampant in the united states, but we have been exporting this model of free-market fundamentalism around the world. we exported it to haiti, for example. people should remember that he was a disaster before the earthquake, because, in part, the united states government imposed this free market on the island despite the will of the people, resulting in fairly dire time before the earthquake. tavis: alan greenspan is part of the reason that we were in the mess that we were in, having to do with aack of due diligence. he has addressed that. i raise that, because the man that now has that seat, ben beanke, who we saw weeks ago, he was the man of the year in " time magazine." i have my own thoughts about that, but share for me what it means when an esteemed institution like "time magazine" says that this guy, who was around when all of this deregulation happened, this is the man that deserves to be the man of the year. what statement does that make where your work is concerned? >> it shows a we are deeply in the nile about the deeper problems re
in the united states, bu we have been exportg is model of free-maet fundamentalism around the world. exrted it to hti, for example. people shod remeer that he was a disasr before the earthquake because, in part, theunited states govement imposed this free market on the island despite the will of the people, resultg in fairly dire time bere the earthquake. tas: alangreenspan is part of th reason that we were in the mess tha we were in, hang to do wi a lack of due ligence. hehas addressed that. i raise that, because the man thatow has that seat, ben bernanke, w we saw weeks ago, he was the man of the year " ti magazine." i have my own thoughts about that, but share for me what it means whenn esteemed instition like "time magazine" says thathis guy, who was around when all othis deregulation happened, this is the man that deserves be the man ofhe year. what statement does that make wheryour work is concerned? >> ithows a we are deeplyin the nile about the deeper problems regarding runninthe feand the economy. i talk in the book out how in many ways we are at the beginning of metamorphosis, w
in the united states, and i am the only comedian ever to have attacked the apollo audience. tavis: i want to hear this story. >> there was a young white wrapper on -- white rapper on, and the audience was heating up. i said you guys are so easy. you are impressed by it. i am offended by it. i said, what you do when you go to the zoo and you go to the monkey cage? he did not go to the monkey cage and say hello, my monkey, my name is paul. you got to the cage and make noises. you go to the monkey's level. that is how i look at that. if it offends me. tavis: and the apollo did what? >> they got quiet. it was the truth. i do not have to defend the truth. the truth defends itself. tavis: if you in your own mind are being truthful and you are killing it in your own mind and the audience is a quiet, is that success? the point is to make us laugh. >> the point is to make us laugh, but audiences like a monster. i remember when i used to try to please the audience and kiss their but, do any thing to make them happy, anything to get a laugh, i learned in beverly hills. i just said, you know what, i
be president of the united states. -- i saidou'll be esident of the united ates. he said i hope yoare right. he was. obama has the same energy the same charis, the same thing that kennedy has, th "it" factor. i lo him. he signed that bill, that thing about raci crime he crimes. i pe that it goes through. i said iope the is not beg psychic. tavis: there is onlone paul mooney. the w book, again, "black is the new white." that is our show for tonight. a cat me on the weekend on blic radiointernational. access to ready a podcast on our website, pbs.or i will see you next time. we leave you wi a classic sketch that paul mooney wrote fo"saturday night live." go night fro l.a. andkeep the faith. >>
, a humanitarian case, but certainly one where the united states is going to bear a continuing central role in rebuilding a desperately poor country. iran, if he let iran go by the boards for the entire year, they would be -- significantly closer to a nuclear capability, by the account of the international atomic energy agency. in the end, his presidentscy is going to be judged on two things, tavis, one is can he get the economy going and the second is, can he say at the end of his four year term that he has significantly repaired those areas that president bush left in disarray. tavis: he's only one year into this. it is fair, i think, to remind us of that. the book out in paper back now from david sanger. it is called the inheritance, "the world obama confronts. good to have you on the program. >> thanks, davis. >> up next, peter fonda. stay with us. >> please welcome peter fonda to the program. the iconic screenwriter and prufere. he has been celebrating the 40th anniversary of his classic easy rider. the film is considered to be one of the top 100 of all time according to the american f
and it is embarrassing a -- but it is true. it is not justhe united states, it iall over the world. tavis:peaking not just being the unit states, you mentied this film you knew was commcial but i don't know if you could havenown how successful it would be. this was a film that gothe attention of hollywo. you didn't spend a lot of money doing this. didn't -- then pyed cash. >> itid worldwi a lot of cash and sti is. this blu-ray will now go out aroundhe world. i have been tang it with me to a degree on manyf the of the events i haveone to but unfortately sony didn't get it readenough for meo pack a few with me. and now it is out. it is a better way of loong at ts -- this film. becse today with these great high defition screens, you get a chance to et t feel of -- whewe had in the theater in 1969. tavis: what made it resonate around the wor. it is an arican story in some ys. yet it resoned around the world, why? >> there was annrest withll of theoung people at the ti. and you know, thereas of course the stuff that was gog downn chicago, at the decratic national convention and that s 1968 and
of 1967, which was the largest civil disturbance in the history of the united states back when it happened. those riots really brought a lot of terrible social issues to the four, -- to the fore, there was an exodus of people. on top of that, you basically now have gm and chrysler having gone through bankruptcy, emerging quickly, but much smaller. there are a lot fewer jobs in the city of detroit there used to pay, and the city of detroit and at southeastern michigan has to find a new engine of growth. it is not clear what is going to replace this the single-legged stool. tavis: with regard your book, "crash course," to questions, what is the take away from the new booked for legislators, policymakers, and what is the take away of the book for consumers? >> for consumers, the take away a few are going to have a much more competitive, much different car market than just a few years ago. we used to talk in terms of the big three, general motors, ford, chrysler. you can wipe that turned out of your vocabulary. what we will have in the future of america is a medium six. there will be about six
how you can define the conclusion. i think that barack obama becoming president of the united states is a small test in the fact that this nation is in a rather incremental way moving forward. i think it is much to america's credit that it could go to that place, however in the aftermath, i think there are millions who have come to the table to tell you that they wish he was dead rather than alive doing some of the things that he is doing. there is also something else we must take into consideration. barack obama is first and foremost a man. he is flawed. he has his contradictions. he has revealed those contradictions. there is a question that we have. do we get behind him and push him to become what we know he should be or do we lay back and watch him drift, watch him capitulate and then say aha, we knew it all along. it is not his conclusion to be ours. is not his fate also to be ours. what role do we as a people play in forcing the mission to go where we know it must go? reminds me of that much-quoted dinner with franklin roosevelt and a. phillip randolph when after a night of tal
child have haitian. tell me about your in-laws. >> they are actually in the united states, but they were extremely concerned. we have all family members accounted for as of last night. it was a difficult week not knowing, the ability to communicate, and we are just one family. there's so many families around the world that are wondering what has happened to their loved ones in haiti, and i hope more families have good news the way we have had so much bad news. mostly good news, up so we are glad for that. >> you have been called to help out. what has transafrica been doing in the last week? >> it is the oldest african american foreign policy association, so we normally work on foreign policy. how we change u.s. policies that might not be fair or just, and this would be a perfect example, but we have really been called upon to draw attention to humanitarian relief efforts, and we are glad to do so. we have been heartened as someone who lives in haiti, but also as an american. i have been so grateful to see the outpouring of support. i have also been disappointed because the coordination h
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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